Monthly Archives: October 2013

In Rehearsal with ALL MY SONS

“Everything that happened seems to be coming back.”

Dale Morris and Savvy Scopelleti as Joe and Kate Keller

Kate Keller, who will be portrayed by Savvy Scopelleti in Monday night’s staged reading at the Encinitas Library, observes this in Act One of Arthur Miller’s All My Sons. It is a foreshadowing comment whose results will change her family entirely by the conclusion of the play.

It is this sense of unease that permeates this particular Miller tale. Written in 1947 on the heels of the war, the play analyzes the aftermath of war in our society within the context of the family. And just as Kate, the matriarch, understands that the past cannot truly be left behind, as the play unfolds, we see the characters navigating their way through relationships, hope, and ultimately their own battle scars.

“What’s so wonderful about Miller is that he writes about universal truths,” says Amanda Sitton, who will be portraying Ann Deever. “He writes about family and love. Unfortunately, the underlying theme of war isn’t something we get away from as a culture.”

Brian Mackey and Amanda Sitton as Chris Keller and Ann Deever

While the families have been irreversibly affected by this period in American history, the unease in the play stems from their refusal to acknowledge the past or to fully deal with the consequences of their past actions. Therefore, while the story seems innocuous at first, the smooth veneer these characters have built over time slowly begins to crack.

In his essay, “Tragedy and the Common Man,” Miller wrote, “The revolutionary questioning of the stable environment is what terrifies.” The stable ground of patriarch Joe Keller, who will be played on Monday by Dale Morris, has been built on secrecy and denial, and it seems as if it is about to be shaken at any moment, thus releasing a domino effect of fallout.

“Miller is one of those faces on the Mount Rushmore of American theatre, so doing this show in any form has been a long-term goal,” says Dale, although he admits that he may harbor some judgment about the characters in the play. Indeed, none of the characters is truly free from critique, even though everyone seems to earnestly defend his or her own past decisions.

“It’s interesting how everyone in the play justifies their own actions,” says Brian Mackey, who will be portraying Chris Keller, the surviving son in his family who is intent on marrying his brother’s former love interest, Ann. “That’s what’s interesting, those decisions in a human life, those moments when you have to make a decision one way or the other and how that affects the people around you.”

“It’s rife with grey area,” observes Amanda. “There’s no true villain.”

Eddie Yaroch as Jim Bayliss

Even though the play was written over 60 years ago, there are still echoes of today’s conflicts. Eddie Yaroch, who will be playing the next-door neighbor, Dr. Jim Bayliss, observes that decisions in our most recent wartime could have been similarly fraught with difficult or even negligent behavior, which is a major source of tension in All My Sons. “There was probably some similar guilt trips happening in the Defense Department that soldiers are dying because of their lack of initiative or funds,” he says.

Ben Cole, who will be portraying Frank Lubey and whose appearance on the scene often lightens the increasing moments of tension, says that each character in the play also carries their own sense of guilt about the war, which also prevents them from moving forward.

“Everyone has a great deal of denial about what actually happened and a great deal of guilt about maybe even surviving or getting off or escaping blame,” he says. “Frank avoided the war completely by being just too old for the draft.”

Christian Payne as Bert

“Bert avoided the war by being way too young,” chimes in Eddie, referring to Christian Payne, 11, who will be portraying Bert, a neighborhood tattletale. When asked why his character feels the need to constantly announce the misdeeds of his friends, Christian replies with, “Well, he’s young. He’s eight, you know.”

Christian joins the cast for his first Intrepid project alongside what Director Christy Yael-Cox calls “a fantastically talented group of actors.” Also featured are Tom Hall as George Deever, Erin Petersen as Lydia Lubey, and Debra Wanger as Sue Bayliss.

– Tiffany Tang

All My Sons by Arthur Miller, a staged reading, will be held at the Encinitas Library, 540 Cornish Drive. Monday, October 28. 6:30 pm complimentary wine/appetizer reception. 7:00 pm reading. Please rsvp to boxoffice@intrepidshakespeare.com and pay with cash/check at the door or purchase tickets in advance. $15.

Intrepid Goes Academic: Fall Classes Start Tomorrow

Fall is upon us – the chill is in the air, the holiday preparation is underway, the scarves are out of their summer hiding spots. While Intrepid Shakespeare finds itself between shows at this time of year, that doesn’t mean that Artistic Directors Sean and Christy Yael-Cox are taking extended vacations. Far from it. Beginning tomorrow, both will start teaching fall classes at the theater.

“It’s a nice time of year,” says Sean, who is also Intrepid’s Director of Education. “We are in pre-production for Macbeth and gearing up to announce our fifth season and our 2014 reading series.” Believe it or not, in the land of Intrepid, this is what qualifies as “downtime.” Fortunately for experienced actors in need of a tune up or new faces needing a landing place, this is also the perfect time for Intrepid to offer a selection of classes revolving around Shakespeare, public speaking, comedy, and scene study.

Christy with actor Kevin Hafso Koppman during Midsummer rehearsals. Photo: Tiffany Tang

While Sean will helm two of the classes, The Play’s the Thing: Intermediate Scene Study will be taught by Producing Artistic Director Christy Yael-Cox. “It’s a great opportunity for people to work with Christy,” says Sean of the woman who has directed or co-directred the entirety of Intrepid’s productions this year, all of which were honored with Critics’ Choice. “She rarely has time to teach classes, so those who are signed up for this one are really lucky.”

In order to register for Christy’s class, at least one year of training is required, or experience acting in at least one production. Christy will be tackling both Shakespeare and modern scenes with her actors, and describes the class as ideal for those who want to work on their craft.

“It’s like a mini-rehearsal session with her,” says Sean.

If a more intensive Shakespeare experience is the goal, Sean will be teaching a class on approaching and acting the Bard for new and experienced actors.

“It’s amazing when I talk to seasoned actors in town and mention our upcoming Shakespeare auditions,” says Sean, who played the title role in Hamlet earlier this year. “Even the most experienced actors have said that they would love to audition, but Shakespeare scares them.”

Sean as Hamlet, Season Three
Photo: Daren Scott

In light of this, Sean feels it is important to bring Shakespeare down from its unreachable, scholarly pedestal and tap into its origins.

“When he was alive, his plays were popular with everybody,” explains Sean. “People forget that Shakespeare wrote for everyone.”

If there’s any fear that four weeks of Shakespeare will be entirely lecture-based, Sean is quick to dispel that. “We’ll be discovering the material by doing,” he says. In other words, be prepared to get on your feet.

Sean’s Shakespeare session is open to new and experienced actors, and he is quick to assure participants that both are necessary to the process of unpacking this playwright.

“Everyone learns so much by watching other actors in class,” he says. “It’s actually really nice when there’s different levels.”

Both The Play’s the Thing: Intermediate Scene Study and Willpower: A Shakespeare Class will commence this weekend and run on Sundays for four weeks. There is still time to register for limited available spots.

Also on the fall docket is Phil Johnson’s A Master Class on Comedy, which will take place November 24. Public Speaking with Sean will begin November 3 for two sessions.

Classes will be held on Intrepid’s mainstage theatre, the Clayton E. Liggett, on the campus of San Dieguito Academy. For more information on fall classes, click here.

– Tiffany Tang

 

Phil Johnson, Master of the Comedi-verse

Phil Johnson to teach a master class on comedy

“I think about comedy all day and all night.”

Phil Johnson, most recently seen this summer as Bottom in Intrepid Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream: the Musical,” admits this obsession without hesitation.

“I probably need a twelve step group for my love of it,” he adds.

In lieu of addiction therapy, Phil Johnson will instead be putting this passion to good use by sharing it with others. Along with Artistic Directors Christy and Sean Yael-Cox, Phil will be an instructor in Intrepid’s brand new offering of fall classes.

What will he be teaching? A master class on comedy, of course.

A comedic stage veteran, Phil has shone on the San Diego stage for more than 15 years, racking up starring turns on the city’s major stages, and receiving a Craig Noel Award this year from the San Diego Critics’ Circle for his rendition of Sheridan Whiteside in “The Man Who Came To Dinner.” Aside from his stints in Los Angeles writing with the Acme Comedy Theatre, his grant from the San Diego Foundation for the Arts to develop his comedy solo show version of “Hound of Baskervilles,” and his comedy/cabaret fellowship with the Eugene O’Neill Theatre Center, his most impressive comedic credit is probably his run as the tavern-owning criminal Thérnardier in the Broadway production and the national tour of “Les Misérables.”

While continuing to develop projects in town, Phil is also eager to share the tips and pointers that his own comedic gurus have taught him over the years. A master class for Intrepid Shakespeare seems the perfect fit.

Phil as Bottom
Photo credit: Daren Scott

“I have a great enthusiasm for good actors who are also good comedians,” he says. “It’s thrilling and exciting to go to the theatre and be impressed by someone who can do both sides of the coin. Plus, I love Sean and Christy, and I would love for there to be a whole bunch of good, funny actors in San Diego for me to play with all the time.”

The three-hour master class will be geared towards professional working actors; however, theatre lovers are also welcome to enroll. While some actors may shy away from comedic training, Phil maintains that the funny bits are completely accessible to even the most dramatic of thespians.

“So many people think it’s separate from them, so they’re not using all the tools in their toolbox,” he says. “Almost any good actor can be a good comedian. It’s about details and intention and thinking things through.”

To that end, he plans to organize the class around a checklist – particulars that the actor can pay attention to in order to achieve the maximum comedic effect from his or her scenes.

“If the audience is laughing, then they are following your story,” explains Phil. “If they aren’t, then you need to shake things up.”

This is why he loves previews, he says, which is that time during the run of a show when things can still be adjusted after receiving input from the audience’s reaction each evening.  “I get to see what works and what doesn’t before opening.”

Phil Johnson with Jacqueline Ritz
Photo credit: Daren Scott

This willingness to continually pursue the perfection of comedic timing is part of paying attention to the details. This is something Phil learned from his comedic stints in theatre, his own teachers, and also from a childhood spent watching the greats: Bill Cosby, Carol Burnett, Sonny and Cher, and Jonathan Winters. Honoring the legacy of comedy is something he feels is fundamental to its study.

“I think one thing that young people don’t do often enough is watch the old stuff. They don’t know who Bette Davis or Rock Hudson are,” says Phil. ”Comedy is so much an homage to what’s come before.”

Studying the legends is one way to keep one’s skills polished and in tune, but nothing beats the experience of a class. “I wish I had had someone to give me a tune up every once in a while,” he says. “You can always be funnier.”

And what if you are rather nervous about taking a master class in comedy?

“Don’t worry,” says Phil. “Nervous people are almost always funny.”

– Tiffany Tang

A Master Class on Comedy with Phil Johnson. November 24, 6-9 pm. Clayton E. Liggett Theatre at Intrepid Shakespeare (SDA Campus). $60. Enroll here.